I9 11900k exclusive no overclocking 8-core full core 5.1ghz temperature up to 100 ℃

In the past few years, Intel has been pursuing high frequency, and constantly put forward various acceleration technologies, such as Rui frequency, Rui frequency 2.0, Rui frequency Max 3.0, TVB (thermal speed acceleration), etc.

On the 11 generation core of rocket lake, Intel has added another “adaptive boost technology”, abbreviated as “abt”, to continue to tap the potential of multi-core acceleration.

I9 11900k exclusive no overclocking 8-core full core 5.1ghz temperature up to 100 ℃

It’s strange that Intel didn’t introduce this technology in its official ppt before, and now it’s been dug up by foreign media.

I9 11900k exclusive no overclocking 8-core full core 5.1ghz temperature up to 100 ℃

According to the introduction, ABT technology will make further use of the available space of system power consumption and heat dissipation, allowing the maximum temperature of 3-8 cores to reach 100 ℃ (TVB can only achieve 70 ℃), but still in line with the official specification limit of current and temperature, and not overclocking.

I9 11900k exclusive no overclocking 8-core full core 5.1ghz temperature up to 100 ℃

However, its application scope is narrower. TVB is only limited to i9 series of non low power consumption version, including i9-11900k, i9-11900kf, i9-11900f and i9-11900f. Abt only supports i9-11900k and i9-11900kf.

For these two processors with or without core display, ruipin 2.0 can accelerate to 1-2 core 5.1ghz, 3-4 core 5.0ghz, 5-6 core 4.8ghz and 7-8 core 4.7ghz.

Ruipin Max 3.0 can further accelerate 1-2 cores to 5.2GHz at the same time.

On the basis of the above, TVB will continue to upgrade 100MHz at each level, that is, 1-2 core 5.3GHz, 3-4 core 5.1ghz, 5-6 core 4.9ghz, 7-8 core 4.8ghz.

Next is the abt stage, only for 3 or more cores, but with 3-8 cores, all cores can be accelerated to 5.1ghz.

In other words, without overclocking, it can make i9-11900k and i9-11900kf work at the high frequency of 5.1ghz!

Of course, the premise is that your radiator has to be able to carry it.